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Artículo Men who remove condoms during sex: the latest form of sexual assault Articles

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Men who remove condoms during sex: the latest form of sexual assault

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Playground Traduccion

27 Abril 2017 09:33

'Stealthing' is encouraged in online communities where men brag about 'sowing their seed'

Recent news headlines which call 'stealthing' a sex trend mask the disturbing reality behind this phenomenon of men who remove condoms during sex without getting their partner's consent. 

The truth is, the practice known as 'stealthing' is a form of nonconsensual sexual assault. The man – heterosexual or homosexual – begins having sex with his partner. He puts the condom on as agreed, but then, during the act – usually when changing positions – he secretly removes the condom and ejaculates without it.

new study, written by Alexandra Brodsky and recently published in the Columbia Journal of Gender and Law, features interviews with victims of stealthing. Brodsky analyses the phenomenon and delves deep into the online world of men who preach this practice. 

These men believe they have the right to 'sow their seed' and they 'root their support in an ideology of male supremacy in which violence is a man's natural right,' Brodsky writes.

 

'One of my goals with the article and in proposing a new statute,' Brodsky told the Huffington Post, 'is to provide a vocabulary and create ways for people to talk about what is a really common experience that is too often dismissed as just "bad sex" instead of "violence."'

Because in the collective imagination the phrase 'sexual violence' continues to be associated with dark alleyways, being raped by strangers, and feelings of guilt and secrecy. And sexual violence is, unfortunately, one of the few crimes in which the first person to be placed under suspicion is the victim.

When in reality the aggressor is often the victim's partner, the sexually violent act takes place in the bedroom – not a grimy back alley, and the victim is not always sure if what just happened was sexual abuse or not.

'One of my goals with the article, and in proposing a new statute, is to provide a vocabulary and create ways for people to talk about what is a really common experience that is too often dismissed as just "bad sex" instead of "violence."'

This is highlighted by Brodsky in her study. Many of the stories she hears from stealthing victims start the same way: 'I'm not sure if this is rape, but...'  Stealthing leaves women feeling emotions similar to those provoked by other forms of sexual violence: shame, guilt, confusion and loss of independence. Victims are also exposed to physical risks such as pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases. 

Although stealthing has yet to be officially recognised as a form of sexual violence, more and more people are asking for it to be considered a sex crime. Earlier this year, a court in Switzerland took a step forward in this direction with a landmark judgement.

The Lausanne Criminal Court in Switzerland convicted a man of rape for removing his condom during sex without telling his partner. One more step towards putting an end to rape culture and teaching everyone that consent is one of the fundamental pillars in any type of relationship. And proof that secretly removing a condom during sex is not a 'trend' or 'fad', but a sinister form of sexual assault. 

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